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Bortolami Now Represents Mary Obering

Bortolami Now Represents Mary Obering

ArtNews

March 12, 2019

Painter Mary Obering has joined the New York–based gallery Bortolami, where she will have a solo show in October. The artist is also represented by the Los Angeles enterprise Kayne Griffin Corcoran.

Mary Obering paintings exhibited in Los Angeles for the first time

Mary Obering paintings exhibited in Los Angeles for the first time

Wallpaper

September 18, 2018

In 1971, the artist Mary Obering moved from Colorado to Soho, at the height of the neighbourhood’s transformation into an artist haven. Nearly 50 years later, the celebrated painter appears in her first solo show at Kayne Griffin Corcoran in Los Angeles, after the gallery began representing her earlier this year.

Kayne Griffin Corcoran Now Represents Painter Mary Obering

Kayne Griffin Corcoran Now Represents Painter Mary Obering

ArtNews

May 3, 2018

The New York–based painter Mary Obering, whose elegant, sumptuous geometric abstractions imbue the spare language of Minimalism with the techniques of the Renaissance, is now represented by the Los Angeles gallery Kayne Griffin Corcoran, which will present a one-person show of her work in September. (Those heading to Frieze New York through Sunday will also find her work on offer at the gallery’s booth.)

Soho Stalwart: Mary Obering is having a revival, with a flurry of gallery shows in New York and Los Angeles.

Soho Stalwart: Mary Obering is having a revival, with a flurry of gallery shows in New York and Los Angeles.

Cultured Magazine

December 11, 2017

The Louisiana-born painter Mary Obering still lives and works in the loft on Wooster Street that she's owned since the early 1970s. It's one of those mythic New York stories, where an artist buys an industrial space downtown for so little that it would be maddening to even mention. For decades, Obering has been producing her boldlyhued geometric paintings there, a twist on the minimal tradition to which the artist belongs. "Soho wasn't the shopping mall that it's become," Obering laughs, remembering her mother visiting from Louisiana in the early days, refusing to step foot in her then new neighborhood.

Mary Obering

Mary Obering

Artforum

November 1996

The visual impact of Obering's work is considerable. The viewer must simultaneously register her anachronistic materials and her use of a grid to frame and structure each image. The hieratic and precious aspect of the gold leaf is lifted from its usual context, and placed in a new one, in which something indefinably different seems to be suggested than was indicated by the use of this material during the Renaissance. There is a hierarchical relationship between the gilded and colored portions of Obering's pieces, but the works also tend to engage the entire exhibition space.

Mary Obering at Littlejohn/Sternau Gallery

Mary Obering at Littlejohn/Sternau Gallery

New York Times

February 1995

The contrast of matte and glossy textures is attractive enough, but what gives the work interest are Ms. Obering's complicated colors, which actually suggest close-up outtakes from painting: a rose-red veined with blue that might derive from the Virgin's dress, a cream touched with pink from an angel's wing. All of this takes a while to register, and its handling is far too deliberate to be transcendent, but it produces an unexpected emotional pull.